Wednesday, October 17, 2012

Dong Po Stewed Pork Belly






My two girls need not attend school this week as it is PSLE marking week. I am on leave for two days to spend some time with them at home. As usual, when I have some time at home, I would plan to cook something nice for the family. Today, it is chinese-style braised pork belly (Dong Po Belly, 东坡肉).

I have a soft spot for belly meat. It is a fatty but flavourful cut. Cook it slow and long (like in this recipe) and a good portion of the fats will be rendered away, the result is a delicious but non-greasy dish.

As this dish is quite time consuming (3-4 hours), I made extra portion and freeze some of the belly meat with the gravy. When I need it for another meal, I just need to reheat and serve.

Update: Click here for my new plating concept for this Dong Po braised belly.

Ingredients

1kg Pork Belly
4-5 stalks spring onions
Straw strings (used for rice dumplings, or normal kitchen twine)
2 tbsp oil
4 cups water
2 slices ginger
2 star anises
1 cinnamon stick
2 tbsp sugar
5 tbsp dark soy sauce
8 tbsp chinese cooking wine (Hua Diao)


Directions

Rinse and cut pork belly into 5cm blocks.

Soak straw strings in water until softened. Tie pork belly with strings and scald in boiling water for 2 minutes.

Heat oil and fry sugar until golden brown. Add water and bring to boil. Add spring onions, gingern star anises, cinnamon stick, dark soy sauce and 4 tbsp of Hua Dia wine. Bring to boil. Add pork and turn down the heat. Simmer for 2 hours.

Turn off the heat. When the meat has cooled, strain the pork gravy. Place pork and gravy in steamer. Add remaining wine and steam for 1 hour.

This is optional but you can thicken the gravy with cornstarch.

Serve with steamed rice or bun.
















18 comments:

  1. Oh my this is one of my favourite dish. I have cooked this once but that time I think I am not good enough to achieve the standard taste. Looking at yours now I think I've to try your recipe. I am drooling now eventhough it is time to go to bed now. I think and believe you are a good cook.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Mel! Hope you had a good sleep last night dreaming of your crepe cake and my dong po belly.. haha.

      Delete
  2. DEFINITELY going to give this a try. It looks, and sounds, amazing.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi There! Welcome to my space. Your new blog on Penang looks interesting...

      Delete
  3. Whoa! A dish I can never resist! Your Dong Po Stewed Pork Belly is to die for! Three exclamation marks, that's how much I love this dish! Oops, one more :) And love the pics too, outstanding. By the way, why do we have to tie the meat? Curious.

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    Replies
    1. The strings prevent the meat from falling apart due to the long cooking process and maintain the square block form. No effect to the taste but helps a lot in the presentation.

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  4. Those pork parcels look damn cute, although I'm curious why you have to tie them up.

    P/S: I've proven to you time and time again I'm not a robot - can get rid of that coding thingy?? It usually takes about 5 attempts before I can get through. LOL.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Answered PH the same question above.

      My girls asked me the same question and I told them they were to be served like gift!

      I'm unaware of the coding thingy... How do I remove?

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    2. Go to Settings, then Posts and Comments and on Show Word Verification, choose "No".

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  5. This is a favourite of my family too! I can't cook this too often for fear of getting blocked arteries! Great presentation!

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    Replies
    1. Thanks Jeannie! I ought to go for my yearly check-up soon!

      Thanks for dropping by.

      Delete
  6. I love that photo of them all tied up like little purses! ANd I love it when pork belly is stewed until i's meltingly soft.

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    Replies
    1. Me too! When's ur birthday? I can DHL one of the belly pouches over to UK. :)

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  7. Wow, the dong po pork belly looks good! Extra rice please! Ao nice of daddy (you) to cook such a gourmet meal for your girls! If only my elder one loves meat too haha! Will definitely try your version, love the glistening look on that juicy meat, yums. :))

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  8. It seems that if you're cooking at home, everything would look like fine dining in a fancy restaurant. For 3-4 hours, that dish indeed proves to be a labor of love. Is there a substitute for Hua Diao? I don't think I can find it anywhere here.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Lea! How are you? Still traveling?

      You can use mirin but it is sweet. If you are using it, reduce the portion of the sugar used in the recipe.

      Delete

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